Ringworm sounds like a worm infestation but is actually a fungal infection of the hairs. It causes scaling of the skin and loss of hair, and classically spreads outwards from a small central point. Cats can easily pass it from one to another, or on grooming tools or bedding, or they can catch it from a variety of other species, particularly from the rodents they so commonly hunt. Longhaired cats can sometimes act as carriers of the fungus without showing any significant clinical signs. Treatment may involve hair clipping and shampoos, but also usually an extended course of anti-fungal medication.

See related websites:

http://www.cat-world.com.au/ringworm-in-cats

http://www.catsofaustralia.com/ringworm-in-cats.htm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=owzxU3r3CDM

http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/cat-care/ringworm

http://www.vcahospitals.com/main/pet-health-information/article/animal-health/ringworm-in-cats/335

http://www.icatcare.org/advice-centre/cat-health/dermatophytosis-ringworm-cats

 

A Morning Kiss

A morning kiss, a discreet touch of his nose landing somewhere on the middle of my face.
Because his long white whiskers tickled, I began every day laughing.

Janet F Faure

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